A curated list of the best Testing libraries.

1. majestic

Majestic is a GUI for Jest.

  • ✅ Run all the tests or a single file
  • ⏱ Toggle watch mode
  • 📸 Update snapshots
  • ❌ Examine test failures as they happen
  • ⏲ Console.log() to the UI for debugging
  • 🚔 Built-in coverage report
  • 🔍 Search tests
  • 💎 Works with flow and typescript projects
  • 📦 Works with Create react app

Majestic supports Jest 20 and above

Get started

Run majestic via npx in a project directory

cd ./my-jest-project # go into a project with Jest
npx majestic # execute majestic

or install Majestic globally via Yarn and run majestic

yarn global add majestic # install majestic globally
cd ./my-jest-project # go into a project with Jest
majestic # execute majestic

or install Majestic globally via Npm and run majestic

npm install majestic -g # install majestic globally
cd ./my-jest-project # go into a project with Jest
majestic # execute majestic

Running as an app

Running with the --app flag will launch Majestic as a chrome app.

Optional configuration

You can configure Majestic by adding majestic key to package.json.

// package.json
{
    "majestic": {
        // if majestic fails to find the Jest package, you can provide it here. Should be relative to the package.json
        "jestScriptPath": "../node_modules/jest/bin/jest.js",
        // if you want to pass additional arguments to Jest, do it here
        "args": ['--config=./path/to/config/file/jest.config.js'],
        // environment variables to pass to the process
        "env": {
          "CI": "true"
        }
    }
}

Optional configuration in project with multiple Jest configuration files

{
    "majestic": {
        "jestScriptPath": "../node_modules/jest/bin/jest.js",
        "configs": {
          "config1": {
            "args": [],
            "env": {}
          },
          "config2": {
            "args": [],
            "env": {}
          }
        }
    }
}

Arguments

--config - Will use this config from the list supplied in optional configuration.

--debug - Will output extra debug info to console. Helps with debugging.

--noOpen - Will prevent from automatically opening the UI url in the browser.

--port - Will use this port if available, else Majestic will pick another free port.

--version - Will print the version of Majestic and will exit.

Shortcut keys

alt+t - run all tests

alt+enter - run selected file

alt+w - watch

alt+s - search

escape - close search

Read more


2. enzyme

Enzyme is a JavaScript Testing utility for React that makes it easier to test your React Components' output.

You can also manipulate, traverse, and in some ways simulate runtime given the output.

Enzyme's API is meant to be intuitive and flexible by mimicking jQuery's API for DOM manipulation
and traversal.

Installation

To get started with enzyme, you can simply install it via npm. You will need to install enzyme
along with an Adapter corresponding to the version of react (or other UI Component library) you
are using. For instance, if you are using enzyme with React 16, you can run:

npm i --save-dev enzyme enzyme-adapter-react-16

Each adapter may have additional peer dependencies which you will need to install as well. For instance,
enzyme-adapter-react-16 has peer dependencies on react and react-dom.

At the moment, Enzyme has adapters that provide compatibility with React 16.x, React 15.x,
React 0.14.x and React 0.13.x.

The following adapters are officially provided by enzyme, and have the following compatibility with
React:

Enzyme Adapter Package React semver compatibility
enzyme-adapter-react-16 ^16.4.0-0
enzyme-adapter-react-16.3 ~16.3.0-0
enzyme-adapter-react-16.2 ~16.2
enzyme-adapter-react-16.1 ~16.0.0-0 || ~16.1
enzyme-adapter-react-15 ^15.5.0
enzyme-adapter-react-15.4 15.0.0-0 - 15.4.x
enzyme-adapter-react-14 ^0.14.0
enzyme-adapter-react-13 ^0.13.0

Finally, you need to configure enzyme to use the adapter you want it to use. To do this, you can use
the top level configure(...) API.

import Enzyme from 'enzyme';
import Adapter from 'enzyme-adapter-react-16';

Enzyme.configure({ adapter: new Adapter() });

3rd Party Adapters

It is possible for the community to create additional (non-official) adapters that will make enzyme
work with other libraries. If you have made one and it's not included in the list below, feel free
to make a PR to this README and add a link to it! The known 3rd party adapters are:

Adapter Package For Library Status
enzyme-adapter-preact-pure preact (stable)
enzyme-adapter-inferno inferno (work in progress)

Running Enzyme Tests

Enzyme is unopinionated regarding which test runner or assertion library you use, and should be
compatible with all major test runners and assertion libraries out there. The documentation and
examples for enzyme use Mocha and Chai, but you
should be able to extrapolate to your framework of choice.

If you are interested in using enzyme with custom assertions and convenience functions for
testing your React components, you can consider using:

Basic Usage

Shallow Rendering

import React from 'react';
import { expect } from 'chai';
import { shallow } from 'enzyme';
import sinon from 'sinon';

import MyComponent from './MyComponent';
import Foo from './Foo';

describe('<MyComponent />', () => {
  it('renders three <Foo /> components', () => {
    const wrapper = shallow(<MyComponent />);
    expect(wrapper.find(Foo)).to.have.lengthOf(3);
  });

  it('renders an .icon-star', () => {
    const wrapper = shallow(<MyComponent />);
    expect(wrapper.find('.icon-star')).to.have.lengthOf(1);
  });

  it('renders children when passed in', () => {
    const wrapper = shallow((
      <MyComponent>
        <div className="unique" />
      </MyComponent>
    ));
    expect(wrapper.contains(<div className="unique" />)).to.equal(true);
  });

  it('simulates click events', () => {
    const onButtonClick = sinon.spy();
    const wrapper = shallow(<Foo onButtonClick={onButtonClick} />);
    wrapper.find('button').simulate('click');
    expect(onButtonClick).to.have.property('callCount', 1);
  });
});

Full DOM Rendering

import React from 'react';
import sinon from 'sinon';
import { expect } from 'chai';
import { mount } from 'enzyme';

import Foo from './Foo';

describe('<Foo />', () => {
  it('allows us to set props', () => {
    const wrapper = mount(<Foo bar="baz" />);
    expect(wrapper.props().bar).to.equal('baz');
    wrapper.setProps({ bar: 'foo' });
    expect(wrapper.props().bar).to.equal('foo');
  });

  it('simulates click events', () => {
    const onButtonClick = sinon.spy();
    const wrapper = mount((
      <Foo onButtonClick={onButtonClick} />
    ));
    wrapper.find('button').simulate('click');
    expect(onButtonClick).to.have.property('callCount', 1);
  });

  it('calls componentDidMount', () => {
    sinon.spy(Foo.prototype, 'componentDidMount');
    const wrapper = mount(<Foo />);
    expect(Foo.prototype.componentDidMount).to.have.property('callCount', 1);
    Foo.prototype.componentDidMount.restore();
  });
});

Static Rendered Markup

import React from 'react';
import { expect } from 'chai';
import { render } from 'enzyme';

import Foo from './Foo';

describe('<Foo />', () => {
  it('renders three .foo-bars', () => {
    const wrapper = render(<Foo />);
    expect(wrapper.find('.foo-bar')).to.have.lengthOf(3);
  });

  it('renders the title', () => {
    const wrapper = render(<Foo title="unique" />);
    expect(wrapper.text()).to.contain('unique');
  });
});

Read more


3. jest

Delightful JavaScript Testing.

👩🏻‍💻 Developer Ready: A comprehensive JavaScript testing solution. Works out of the box for most JavaScript projects.

🏃🏽 Instant Feedback: Fast, interactive watch mode only runs test files related to changed files.

📸 Snapshot Testing: Capture snapshots of large objects to simplify testing and to analyze how they change over time.

See more on jestjs.io

Getting Started

Install Jest using yarn:

yarn add --dev jest

Or npm:

npm install --save-dev jest

Note: Jest documentation uses yarn commands, but npm will also work. You can compare yarn and npm commands in the yarn docs, here.

Let's get started by writing a test for a hypothetical function that adds two numbers. First, create a sum.js file:

function sum(a, b) {
  return a + b;
}
module.exports = sum;

Then, create a file named sum.test.js. This will contain our actual test:

const sum = require('./sum');

test('adds 1 + 2 to equal 3', () => {
  expect(sum(1, 2)).toBe(3);
});

Add the following section to your package.json:

{
  "scripts": {
    "test": "jest"
  }
}

Finally, run yarn test or npm test and Jest will print this message:

PASS  ./sum.test.js
✓ adds 1 + 2 to equal 3 (5ms)

You just successfully wrote your first test using Jest!

This test used expect and toBe to test that two values were exactly identical. To learn about the other things that Jest can test, see Using Matchers.

Running from command line

You can run Jest directly from the CLI (if it's globally available in your PATH, e.g. by yarn global add jest or npm install jest --global) with a variety of useful options.

Here's how to run Jest on files matching my-test, using config.json as a configuration file and display a native OS notification after the run:

jest my-test --notify --config=config.json

If you'd like to learn more about running jest through the command line, take a look at the Jest CLI Options page.

Read more


4. react-testing-library

React Testing Library.

Simple and complete React DOM testing utilities that encourage good testing
practices.

The problem

You want to write maintainable tests for your React components. As a part of
this goal, you want your tests to avoid including implementation details of your
components and rather focus on making your tests give you the confidence for
which they are intended. As part of this, you want your testbase to be
maintainable in the long run so refactors of your components (changes to
implementation but not functionality) don't break your tests and slow you and
your team down.

The solution

The React Testing Library is a very lightweight solution for testing React
components. It provides light utility functions on top of react-dom and
react-dom/test-utils, in a way that encourages better testing practices. Its
primary guiding principle is:

[The more your tests resemble the way your software is used, the more
confidence they can give you.][guiding-principle]

Installation

This module is distributed via [npm][npm] which is bundled with [node][node] and
should be installed as one of your project's devDependencies:

npm install --save-dev @testing-library/react

or

for installation via [yarn][yarn]

yarn add --dev @testing-library/react

This library has peerDependencies listings for react and react-dom.

You may also be interested in installing code>@testing-library/jest-dom</code so you can
use the custom jest matchers.

Examples

Basic Example

// hidden-message.js
import * as React from 'react'

// NOTE: React Testing Library works well with React Hooks and classes.
// Your tests will be the same regardless of how you write your components.
function HiddenMessage({children}) {
  const [showMessage, setShowMessage] = React.useState(false)
  return (
    <div>
      <label htmlFor="toggle">Show Message</label>
      <input
        id="toggle"
        type="checkbox"
        onChange={e => setShowMessage(e.target.checked)}
        checked={showMessage}
      />
      {showMessage ? children : null}
    </div>
  )
}

export default HiddenMessage
// __tests__/hidden-message.js
// these imports are something you'd normally configure Jest to import for you
// automatically. Learn more in the setup docs: https://testing-library.com/docs/react-testing-library/setup#cleanup
import '@testing-library/jest-dom'
// NOTE: jest-dom adds handy assertions to Jest and is recommended, but not required

import * as React from 'react'
import {render, fireEvent, screen} from '@testing-library/react'
import HiddenMessage from '../hidden-message'

test('shows the children when the checkbox is checked', () => {
  const testMessage = 'Test Message'
  render(<HiddenMessage>{testMessage}</HiddenMessage>)

  // query* functions will return the element or null if it cannot be found
  // get* functions will return the element or throw an error if it cannot be found
  expect(screen.queryByText(testMessage)).toBeNull()

  // the queries can accept a regex to make your selectors more resilient to content tweaks and changes.
  fireEvent.click(screen.getByLabelText(/show/i))

  // .toBeInTheDocument() is an assertion that comes from jest-dom
  // otherwise you could use .toBeDefined()
  expect(screen.getByText(testMessage)).toBeInTheDocument()
})

Complex Example

// login.js
import * as React from 'react'

function Login() {
  const [state, setState] = React.useReducer((s, a) => ({...s, ...a}), {
    resolved: false,
    loading: false,
    error: null,
  })

  function handleSubmit(event) {
    event.preventDefault()
    const {usernameInput, passwordInput} = event.target.elements

    setState({loading: true, resolved: false, error: null})

    window
      .fetch('/api/login', {
        method: 'POST',
        headers: {'Content-Type': 'application/json'},
        body: JSON.stringify({
          username: usernameInput.value,
          password: passwordInput.value,
        }),
      })
      .then(r => r.json().then(data => (r.ok ? data : Promise.reject(data))))
      .then(
        user => {
          setState({loading: false, resolved: true, error: null})
          window.localStorage.setItem('token', user.token)
        },
        error => {
          setState({loading: false, resolved: false, error: error.message})
        },
      )
  }

  return (
    <div>
      <form onSubmit={handleSubmit}>
        <div>
          <label htmlFor="usernameInput">Username</label>
          <input id="usernameInput" />
        </div>
        <div>
          <label htmlFor="passwordInput">Password</label>
          <input id="passwordInput" type="password" />
        </div>
        <button type="submit">Submit{state.loading ? '...' : null}</button>
      </form>
      {state.error ? <div role="alert">{state.error}</div> : null}
      {state.resolved ? (
        <div role="alert">Congrats! You're signed in!</div>
      ) : null}
    </div>
  )
}

export default Login
// __tests__/login.js
// again, these first two imports are something you'd normally handle in
// your testing framework configuration rather than importing them in every file.
import '@testing-library/jest-dom'
import * as React from 'react'
// import API mocking utilities from Mock Service Worker.
import {rest} from 'msw'
import {setupServer} from 'msw/node'
// import testing utilities
import {render, fireEvent, screen} from '@testing-library/react'
import Login from '../login'

const fakeUserResponse = {token: 'fake_user_token'}
const server = setupServer(
  rest.post('/api/login', (req, res, ctx) => {
    return res(ctx.json(fakeUserResponse))
  }),
)

beforeAll(() => server.listen())
afterEach(() => {
  server.resetHandlers()
  window.localStorage.removeItem('token')
})
afterAll(() => server.close())

test('allows the user to login successfully', async () => {
  render(<Login />)

  // fill out the form
  fireEvent.change(screen.getByLabelText(/username/i), {
    target: {value: 'chuck'},
  })
  fireEvent.change(screen.getByLabelText(/password/i), {
    target: {value: 'norris'},
  })

  fireEvent.click(screen.getByText(/submit/i))

  // just like a manual tester, we'll instruct our test to wait for the alert
  // to show up before continuing with our assertions.
  const alert = await screen.findByRole('alert')

  // .toHaveTextContent() comes from jest-dom's assertions
  // otherwise you could use expect(alert.textContent).toMatch(/congrats/i)
  // but jest-dom will give you better error messages which is why it's recommended
  expect(alert).toHaveTextContent(/congrats/i)
  expect(window.localStorage.getItem('token')).toEqual(fakeUserResponse.token)
})

test('handles server exceptions', async () => {
  // mock the server error response for this test suite only.
  server.use(
    rest.post('/api/login', (req, res, ctx) => {
      return res(ctx.status(500), ctx.json({message: 'Internal server error'}))
    }),
  )

  render(<Login />)

  // fill out the form
  fireEvent.change(screen.getByLabelText(/username/i), {
    target: {value: 'chuck'},
  })
  fireEvent.change(screen.getByLabelText(/password/i), {
    target: {value: 'norris'},
  })

  fireEvent.click(screen.getByText(/submit/i))

  // wait for the error message
  const alert = await screen.findByRole('alert')

  expect(alert).toHaveTextContent(/internal server error/i)
  expect(window.localStorage.getItem('token')).toBeNull()
})

We recommend using Mock Service Worker library
to declaratively mock API communication in your tests instead of stubbing
window.fetch, or relying on third-party adapters.

Read more